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I am primarily a videographer with over 13 years of experience. Photography interested me because there is only one frame to tell a story. I prefer staged photos because I get absolute control over every detail.

My favorite part of photography is the fun craft that can be used to create a shot. All of my backgrounds, rigging, and staging tools were made in my garage. ” OCUS posts tons of food photography jobs. These are a lot of fun because I get to use lots of craft to get a good shot. There is also a lot of freedom within the bookings. I get to communicate directly with the restaurant instead of dealing with an agent. This really helps when there is a location change or alteration to the project. “

“A good food photo should make you want to rub your face in it.” 

According to me, food photography is interesting because food is treated with more reverence than any other kind of photography. Weddings, sports, corporate, and many other kinds can be silly. Playfulness is permitted in many formal settings. Food is very rigid as a medium. There seems to be an unbreakable rule that food must be treated like sculpture. Nothing playful or irreverent is allowed otherwise it may disgust an interested customer. I guess that food is perceived as a basic necessity and not meant to be taken with any humor. Because of that perception, there really isn’t any standout photographers in this field. Unique angles and creative props are basically the height of food photography. If there were a balance of taste and humor, then maybe food photography could be as dynamic as street photography or fine art.

The most difficult thing I ever had to shoot was a paper plate with a scoop of macaroni and cheese. This was nine-dollar macaroni and cheese at a fancy location. The owner just asked me to make it look great. It took a long lens, suspending a fork, lots of spray glycerin, cracked pepper, and twine to make it worth the nine dollars.

I would like to share with the OCUS community Fast, Cheap, and Out of Control by Errol Morris. It really gets you thinking about free-association. Your brain can’t help trying to find the connective tissue between four, seemingly unrelated people.

Photos credits: ©James Price / OCUS US
Words reported by Sonia Lounes

James Price is a professional photographer.
Check out his work: website and Instagram